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Fancy Living And Working Abroad?

Blog photoHere Are Some Awesome Career Suggestions That Could See You Traveling The World

There are many reasons why someone would want to pack up their old life and move abroad to work. Perhaps you’ve just been through a bad breakup? Or maybe you’ve not got many friends left thanks to them all settling down and getting married? Either way, achieving this goal is a lot simpler than you might expect, and with that in mind, the article you’re reading today has been written in an attempt to give you some great tips and advice. Obviously, you’ll need to retrain in a new career to find work in another country, and so I’m going to list a few now that you might find interesting and fulfilling.

Just take note of the fact that this isn’t a comprehensive list, and there are many other desirable skills the governments of other countries are looking for. Even so, from my own experience, and in my own opinion, the career paths listed here are some of the best and most enjoyable out there, so you definitely shouldn’t overlook them too quickly.

Teaching English

Nearly every country about the world that doesn’t have English as their first language employ native speakers with only basic qualifications to educate their children. In the UK, you’d need a degree and more to score a job like this, but abroad, so long as you complete a basic teacher training course, this really isn’t necessary.

Engineering

Let’s face facts. The US and the UK produce some of the best engineers in the world, and so it’s unsurprising most other countries consider qualified individuals to be endlessly desirable. Sure, you’ll need to head off to university to get the certificates first, but this won’t take that long. You only need to look at Akhtaboot’s list of jobs in Dubai to see how many opportunities are out there. So, becoming an engineer could well see you living abroad indefinitely, if that’s what you’re looking for.

Doctor / Medical

Why do you think so many families from around the world send their children to study medicine in the west? Well, I can tell you. It’s because our health systems are allowed far more funding than those in other countries, which means we inevitably have better equipment, more opportunities and a more accurate understanding of common conditions. This is just one of the reasons why British and American doctors are much sought after in impoverished areas, and why you should consider re-educating yourself to take full advantage of this.

Plumbing

Lastly, if the other suggestions sounded a little too ambitious for you, then becoming a plumber might make things easier. While it’s not the most skilled job in the world, many African and Asian nations consider trained professionals to be in demand, and so you won’t have any trouble finding somewhere hot and pleasant to work.

As you can see, there are lots of different ways you can work abroad, and so you just need to pick the one you feel is most suited to your current abilities and skills. I wish you the best of luck with this, and remember, deciding to live and work abroad could seriously change your life forever!

Sam Gatt, a UK-based contributor who writes on all things business and career related

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5 Careers English Students Might Enjoy After Graduation

librarianOnce you’ve completed your English course at school, college or university, it will be time to start thinking about what kind of career path would be most suitable given your skills and personal interests. Luckily, a lot of different companies require their staff to have excellent spelling and grammar abilities, so the possibilities really are endless. Still, sometimes it’s a good idea to hear suggestions from other people, which is precisely why I’ve written the article you’re reading today. You obviously want to aim for the best paid position possible, and so the ideas featured before could serve to give you the inspiration needed.

1. Librarian

You might think that working in a library would be a bit boring, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Librarians are responsible for categorizing titles, dealing with loans and placing orders for new publications they know will go down well with their clientele. On top of this, you might be surprised to learn the salary is usually very attractive.

2. Primary School Teacher

If you enjoy spending time with children and helping them to increase their knowledge, becoming a primary school teacher could provide you with all the job satisfaction you’ll ever need. Don’t get me wrong, you’ll need more than a basic English qualification from ECOT to score a job like this, but that’s still a brilliant place to start on this career path. In most circumstances, you’ll need to complete a full three year degree course in a relevant subject, and then enroll on a 12 month teacher training course to hone your skills.

3. Writer / Author

As you’ve spent so long learning how to spell and use grammar properly, it might make sense to capitalise on these skills by becoming a full time writer or author. Selling books is tough, so you’ll need to spend a lot of time researching the markers before settling on the subject of your first title. However, these days you can find well paid work with many of the internet’s top marketing agencies, who are always on the look out for new talent.

4. Professional Editor

You could turn that last idea around on its head and start a career as a professional proofreader and editor. Obviously, you’ll need an impeccable understanding of language to make a success of this, but as many top publishers pay in excess of £30,000 to editors for their most anticipated titles, this role could leave you with enough money to retire early and enjoy the good life.

5. Journalist

Okay, so, every English graduate probably dreams of working at a top fleet street newspaper, right? Well, this goal may not be too far beyond your reach. While there are often thousands of candidates for vacancies in this industry, you stand just as much chance as the next person, so start contacting your favourite companies now to find out about the next round of interviews.

Just remember, your destiny is now in your own hands, so you must to everything you can to make it a fruitful one. And anyway, If all else fails, at least you’ll know how to fill the forms in properly at the jobcentre.

Cheers for reading guys!

Sam Gatt, a UK-based contributor who writes on all things business and career related.

How to Perfect Your Job Interview Techniques

If you’ve just received a phone call from one of the companies you’ve sent your CV/resume off to recently offering you a face to face interview, it’s time to start thinking about what you can do to give yourself a fighting chance of winning that all important full time contract. Spending an hour or two online reading guides like this could be the perfect way to brush up on your skills and work out exactly what you should, and shouldn’t say to this potential empInterview photoloyer. Remember, as much as we all hate to admit it, first impressions really do count, and people are generally very quick to judge, so you need to ensure you appear confident, hard working, and knowledgeable. Any failure to do this could result in a negative outcome.

Considering all that, the post you’ve found today will aim to highlight a number of points you may wish to consider. So long as you follow all my advice, the chances of you winning the employer over and obtaining the job of your dreams will be greatly increased. No matter which industry you’re looking to join, the advice beneath this paragraph is guaranteed to help you achieve your goal.

Learn About The Role For Which You Are Applying

Firstly, you’re going to look pretty stupid if you sit down and you haven’t done any research into the job on offer. Whoever is sat in front of you could well ask what you know about the role straightaway, and while you won’t completely mess up your chances if you admit you know very little, it’s much better to impress them with your knowledge and show that you’ve been doing your homework.

Learn About The Company Offering The Job

Secondly, in almost all circumstances, those people running the interview will likely ask you about your knowledge of their company’s operations as a whole. To find out all the information you need, just visit their website for an hour or two before leaving home for the interview, so all the interesting facts about their business are fresh in your mind. Again, this will make you look smart and incredibly keen.

Think About Your Appearance

While it might be suitable to attend an interview at a manual company like Access Platforms Online wearing smart jeans and a shirt, if the role advertised will be more focused towards the office environment, you’ll almost always create a better impression by wearing a full suit. Of course, this is something you should work out on an individual basis considering all the details you’ve learned about the business. For instance, some modern thinking young companies might encourage their staff to come in wearing casual clothes, even in an office environment.

Think About Your General Attitude

No matter what you say and whom you see, it’s vital you display a positive and motivated attitude towards the prospect of working for the company. Even if you turn up and see things are much less exciting than you imagined, it’s important not to let this show. At the end of the day, you want to earn a good wage don’t you?

Well jobseekers, that’s about all we’ve got time for today. Just make sure you also take a pen and paper along for any interviews you may have in the near future, as this also makes people think you’re 100% committed to winning the role.

Good luck!

Sam Gatt, a UK-based contributor who writes on all things business and career related

Photograph credit

What is your place in the film industry?

Not Sure What Path To Take? Check Out These 7 Career Ideas To Give You Food for Thought

ConstructionUpon leaving full time education, you’re going to have a potentially life changing decision to make. Your choice of career path could determine the path of your life for the next ten years or even longer, so it’s vitally important you perform a significant amount of research and get things right. Nobody wants to waste two or three years in a role only to discover they hold no enjoyment for the job, which is one of the main reasons this article has been created.

Hopefully, after reading through the 7 top suggestions listed below, you’ll have enough inspiration to find something you’ll truly excel at.

Here they are:

1. Construction

Whether you decide to become an architect or a builder, working in the construction industry is ideal for people who enjoy spending time outdoors. You’ll need to be strong and fit to succeed, but the potential earnings in this career are pretty favourable. You could even try to enter a niche market by working for a company that specialises in a particular product like Leominster Farm Buildings or something similar.

2. Recruitment Consultant

Have you noticed the lack of good jobs available at the moment? Well then, it might be sensible to join one of the only industries known to grow at times like this. As a recruitment consultant, your job will be finding unemployed people work and making a commission from their earnings. You’ll need excellent social skills and a good telephone manner to succeed at this.

3. School Teacher

If you like the idea of having lots of holidays and actually making a difference in the lives of young people, becoming a teacher could provide you will all the fulfillment you’ll ever need. Obviously, you’ll need to specialise in a subject at university before taking the teaching course, but there’s nothing stopping you from choosing something simple like geography or history. Earnings are also very reasonable for this job.

4. Police Man / Woman

Do you watch the news and spend hours thinking about all those criminals who take advantage of people? Would you like to really have an impact on society? Then joining the police force is the perfect career move. You’ll have to work hard at remembering certain parts of the law, and you might get in a slightly dangerous situation from time to time, but it will be worth it.

5. PR Consultant

Presuming you find the world of advertising to be interesting but you don’t want to me a full-blown marketer, opting to either set up your own business, or join an established PR consultancy firm could satisfy all your urges. This is perfect for people who have an interest in human psychology, and those who don’t mind spending all day sat in front of a computer.

6. Stock Broker

With the recent success of Martin Scorsese’s film “The Wolf of Wall Street”, many people are considering a career in the stock market. While you might think it’s a difficult job to find, once you’re in, you stand to make millions. You’ll need a number of skills relating to persuasion, and a conscience you’re able to ignore.

7. Diving Instructor

Finally, this is out wildcard today. So long as you have adequate swimming skills, and you like spending time with other people, becoming a diving instructor could seriously change your life. There are many companies all over the world who provide instructors to popular holiday destinations by the sea, so you could end up spending your summers in somewhere like Morocco. Not bad eh?

After reading through those suggestions, you should be much closer to finding the ideal career path and starting your adult life in the real world. Good luck with the decision, I’m certain you’ll make the right choice when the time comes.

See you soon!

Uk-based contributor Sam Gatt, a blogger on all things business and career related.

How can I make my resume appealing to employers?

resume1Shane from Red Rocks Community College asked:

I have been out of the workforce for almost three years.  I have been taking classes to pursue a degree and now that my course load will slow down to half time, I want to get some part time employment in my chosen field. I am concerned about my resume.  It does not reflect any experience in this field and does show the gap in my employment. What are some creative and truthful ways to dress my resume for success so that a potential employer can see I am strong candidate candidate?

Hi Shane –

The first thing to remember is that your resume is a marketing document, not an informational document.

Its purpose is NOT to present a general summary of everything there is to know about you.

Rather, its purpose is to present the most relevant information about your qualifications (education, experience, skills and characteristics) in meaningful and accessible ways.

Here are some quick tips:

Your Contact Information

Provide your name, email address and one phone number.  If you have a LinkedIn account and you maintain that account, you should also list the URL to your LinkedIn profile in your contact information.  Don’t provide multiple email addresses or phone numbers, and only include your mailing or physical address if you can find a compelling reason to do so.

Warning! I saw it on a resume template is NOT a compelling reason!

Ask yourself:  Does a potential employer really need to see this information in order to consider me for employment?  If the answer is “no,” leave it off your resume.

Your Education

If you are using your education at the catalyst for a significant change in your career path, put your education before your experience.  It is more relevant to where you want to go with your career, so it will be of greater importance to potential employers.  I assume that you are pursuing a degree that related to your chosen field. (I certainly hope so!).  Use your Education section to highlight relevant coursework, experiential class projects, academic achievement, etc.

Don’t assume that potential employers know anything about the degree you are pursuing.  You have to explain it to them.

Ask yourself: What about my education do employers need to know in order to consider me for employment?  Focus on that information in your resume.

Your Experience

Your past experience may not be directly relevant to the types of jobs you wish to pursue, but it does say something about your maturity, dependability, professionalism, ability to work well with others, ability to deliver quality service, and a variety of other skills and characteristics employers value and seek in potential employees.  Use your Experience section to illustrate (through examples) the qualities, skills, and characteristics you offer.

Don’t simply list job description information!  Job descriptions say nothing about you – they are all about the job itself.  Your resume should be about you.

In describing your experience, focus on YOU and not on the the positions you held.

Your Time Away from the Workforce

You mention that you have been out of the workforce for three years AND that you have just transitioned from being a full-time student to being a part-time student.

Be ready to have that conversation with potential employers.

Be ready to talk about how you are using the opportunity away from the workforce to get more education, to become more skilled and to become skilled in new areas.

Whether you left a job to go back to school or your job left you, you decided to take advantage of the opportunity to become more employable!  THAT is a good story!  That is the kind of story potential employers like to hear.

Your Interests and Hobbies

Be careful including hobbies and interests on your resume.  Make sure they are serving a legitimate purpose.

They show I am a well-rounded person with diverse interests is not a strong enough reason to include hobbies and interests on your resume.

If you are a very competitive person, and competitiveness is a characteristic employers in your field seek in potential employees, including a hobby that fuels your competitive spirit can be a good thing. Competitive sports, for example.

If you are a history buff and a rich knowledge of history is a beneficial in your chosen field, include this information on your resume.

If you are a marathon runner, and you are seeking employment in fields that require personal discipline, endurance, individual effort and perseverance, include this information on your resume.

Get the idea? Everything on your resume must serve a specific purpose.  If it doesn’t serve a purpose – take it off your resume!

Answer this One Simple Question

You stated in your question that you want employers reading your resume to see that you are a strong candidate.  Look at everything you are thinking of putting on your resume and ask yourself:

How does this information show employers that I am a strong candidate?

If you don’t like your answer, see if you can refine/restate the information truthfully so that it will show you are a strong candidate.

If you can’t find a way to effectively refine/restate the information truthfully, it probably doesn’t belong on your resume.

Two last bits of advice:

  1. Seek out the assistance from the career coaches and counselors on your college campus.  You will find they can be really helpful.
  2. Check out my Resume Writing Guide and the sample resumes in my Resume Gallery.  Combined they offer a lot of examples of how to effectively present your qualifications in resume format.

Good luck!

matt-signature

I can’t get any interviews. What am I doing wrong?

frustratedArmando from Monterry Tech recently asked:

I have a Bachelor’s in Marketing, two Master’s degrees (Mass Media and and MIB) and a Ph.D. I can’t seem to get a single interview when sending my resume online. I am frustrated. I have consulted experts, and they all agree that my resume format is OK. What am I doing wrong?

Hi Armando –

I can sense your frustration, That said, I can’t tell you what you are doing wrong unless I know what kind of work you are seeking and how you are going about your search.

I do know this: Simply applying online for jobs and hoping for interviews is not an effective job search strategy; it is a small part of an effective job search strategy, but not a strategy unto itself.

You also mentioned that you consulted experts … what are their areas of expertise? Just because someone is expert in one field, does not make them an expert in all fields or in job hunting or recruiting.  So, be careful to evaluate all advice you receive (including advice from me!), because not all of the advice you receive is good advice!

With that caveat – here is some of my advice:

More is not necessary better when it comes to education

You are certainly well educated.  You have four degrees!  Unfortunately, more education does not necessarily mean more marketable or more desireable to employers.  The qualifications you offer must make sense to potential employers and must be relevant to their hiring needs.  If someone needs to hire a chemical engineer, they are not going to care that you have a Ph.D. in Computer Science.

Also, does your series of degrees tell a coherent story?  Are the degrees in related fields?  Do they complement each other?  Or, are they in widely different fields and unrelated?  As a job seeker, it is your responsibility to help potential employers understand who you are, what you offer, and what you want.

While one employer might look at your resume and say: Look at how well-rounded and highly educated he is!

Another might look at it and say: Why did this guy get degrees in three different fields?  He’s all over the place!

It’s not about the volume of the education. It’s about the relevance.

Resumes are not “one size fits all” documents

Most employers do not hire “renaissance men”, so a generic, all-encompassing resumes are not typically effective job search tools.  They might be exceptionally well-formatted, well-written and free from typographical errors, but if they are full of information that is not relevant to the hiring employer, they may actually hurt your cause.  I recommend that you focus your resume to feature those aspects of your education, experience, skills and characteristics that are relevant to the employers you are targeting.  Leave the rest off.

You may need to have a few versions of your resume, so be prepared.  Don’t waste time customizing a unique resume for every job, but do make sure that the resumes you send are written to present your qualifications in terms relevant to the employers and kinds of jobs you are seeking.

Employers hire based on what they need, not on what you offer

Employers hire to meet specific needs when they have those needs.  They do not usually hire people when they are available just because they are available and have strong general credentials.  If you have what employers need, and you tell your story well, you will get considered for available opportunities.  It really is that simple.

If you tell a clear and compelling story about your qualifications, and your qualifications align well with the needs of hiring employers, you will get interviews.  If your story is unclear and/or your qualfications do not align well with hiring needs, employers will have no need or desire to interview you.

It’s basic, supply and demand economics.

One last thing: I strongly recommend you review my post Four Job Interview Questions You Must Be Able To Answer.

If you can answers these questions, you will be poised for success.

Good luck,

Does my resume need an Objective statement?

One of the most viewed blogs on TheCampusCareerCoach.com and one of the most often asked questions!

The Campus Career Coach

Jennifer from the University of Houston – Downtown asked:

I often see articles on the web that offer employment tips. The majority of these tips make sense and are often repeated in other articles. One tip, however, has me confused: Should my resume have an Objective statement?

Some of the articles from career experts say that putting the “Objective'” on your resume is useless and a cliche and that most employers don’t even read them.

A lot of resume sites, however,  still suggest or even require an objective on resumes.

So what’s up with “Objectives”?

Hi Jennifer –

This is one of my favorite questions.  Why?  Because there are so many different opinions on the topic of Objectives.

First – please know that there is not one absolute and always correct answer to your question.  The right answer for you depends on your circumstances.  Don’t worry – I’ll explain…

View original post 735 more words

I love my job as an architect! (David Schultz)

David Schultz, AIA, NCARB, LEED is the principal architect at David F. Schultz Associates Ltd. in Barrington, IL.  David F. Schultz Associates was founded in 1986 and specializes in the design of churches, preschools, parochial schools and other facilities for church-based ministries. David’s firm has designed more than 372 facilities over the past 26 years.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

I always wanted to be an architect.  I constantly played with blocks, made huge towns out of them that would wind throughout our house.  I built tree houses in my backyard. Some kids got into trouble for chewing gum or passing notes during class – I got into trouble for sketching buildings in my notebooks when I should have been paying attention to the teacher. I still have a notebook of “gravity-defying” buildings I designed in 4th and 5th grade.

I’m grateful my parents encouraged my interest in architecture. They had hoped I would become a Pastor, but they never pushed that on me– to the contrary, they encouraged my interest in architecture. In fact, throughout high school my standing request for a Christmas present was subscriptions to the two major architectural publications, and my parents honored that request every year.  My dad was also very interested in buildings, so he and I would explore buildings together when we took family vacations.

Ever since I was a kid, I have always been intrigued by buildings.  I love to explore them, and I love to design them.  On some level, I have always been architect.

At the time I went to college (in the mid-1970s), I was told that just under one third of the licensed architects in the country were graduates of the University of Illinois.  Those numbers have changed dramatically since then, as more and more universities started offering architecture degrees, but when I went to school, Illinois was one of the primary places that did.  My dad is a Michigan alum, so I know he was disappointed I didn’t go to Michigan.  At least I stayed stay in the Big Ten!

What is unique about going to college for Architecture?  What should a prospective student expect?

Know what you are getting yourself into! Architecture is a grueling college curriculum.  I had 20 hours per week of required design lab each semester for which I only got 3 academic credits.  It’s not that the curriculum is that much more difficult than, say, accounting; it is just very time intensive, and that rigor weeds out who really wants to be an architect and who does not.

My freshman class started with over 320 architecture students – we graduated 87.  I think that kind of attrition is not something most students expect.  This weeding out process was intended to prepare us for the real world.  Clients are very demanding, and if you are going to be a successful architect, you had better be prepared to deliver results on time and design buildings that won’t fall down.

That’s pretty much the first rule of architecture:  Build things that won’t fall down.

What is the job market today for architects?

There are more options available today, but the job market is just as tough now as it was when I got out of school in the late-1970s.  Back then the economy was really bad as a result of the oil embargo.  I got a job out of school because I knew a guy who knew a guy. The guy I knew liked me a lot and helped me get my foot in the door with the guy he knew who happened to need people to do some drafting.

Of course, I walked in on my first day thinking I was God’s gift to architecture. Within 10 minutes I realized I wasn’t and that my education in the real world was just starting. I was really fortunate; many of my fellow graduates were not as lucky to get jobs.

The job market is similar today.  Given the current economic conditions, particularly here in Illinois, very few firms are hiring at any significant levels.  It’s tough right now.  But as I said, there are a lot more options for new graduates today; particularly for those folks with computer and construction industry skills.  New graduates with current technology skills are needed; particularly in larger firms.

The entry-level architects who have internship experience under their belt have a great advantage over those who don’t.

What courses did you take in college that didn’t seem to make sense at the time but have proven valuable?

Let’s see – I took 3 hours of microbiology and 3 hours of astronomy, and I haven’t used any of it.

However my math classes, particularly, calculus and advanced calculus, have been invaluable, even though at the time I didn’t want to take them because they were hard. They really help me understand how things work and understand things from a structural engineer’s perspective.  I’m a design guy and being able to understand things from the structural engineer’s perspective is critically important.  So, definitely my math classes.

Also, general history and the humanities.  I took classes in Greek and Mesopotamian Literature and Mythology.  I really enjoyed these classes, but didn’t think they would be that valuable.  More recently I have become an avid student of American history.  Architecture and history go hand in hand, and a lot of modern architecture has its roots in the structures of ancient Greece and Mesopotamia.

So, along with math – history and the humanities!

Is a graduate degree required to become an architect?

There is a lot of confusion around that question. When I was in school, you could get a 4-year degree, and with three years of experience you could get licensed. Now, you have to get a 5-year professional degree, and a 6-year degree is considered a graduate degree.  You are going to have trouble getting licensed in some states if you don’t have a graduate degree, so a graduate degree is almost a given – you have to have it if you are going to pursue the career.

It is required to get an NCARB Certificate in order to be licensed in multiple states, and to maintain your license you have to do annual professional development

Tell me about your career path

I started my career doing drafting for a tiny firm in the suburbs.  It certainly wasn’t glamorous, but the guy I worked for really taught me how a building comes together.  I learned a lot, but it wasn’t fancy.

My long term goal was to design churches, and the premiere architectural firm doing that kind of work was in Rockford, Illinois (another suburb of Chicago); but they weren’t hiring.

I remember going into my office to announce that my wife and I were expecting our first child.  My announcement was greeted with a lay-off notice!  Not the response I was expecting, of course, but a major project had just been completed, and they didn’t have any work. As a result, all of us got laid off.

I must have reached out to 80 firms throughout the Chicago-land area via phone, postal mail or foot, including that firm I really wanted to work for.  As it turned out, they were looking to open a small Chicago office with two people, and they were interested in me and one of my classmates from Illinois to be that two-person team.  That is when my career really took off.  I had a design job with an architectural firm specializing in churches, I was working with a former classmate, and I was making enough money to support my wife and growing family.  It was a real blessing.

After establishing my reputation with that firm, I decided to strike out on my own and in 1986 started my own company.  26 years and 372 projects later, here I am!  And, I still love it.

What don’t you love about your job?

Government mandated paperwork!  I spend so much time filling out government forms and paying fees and taxes I never used to have to.  It is getting harder and harder to be a small business person.

Here’s an example: The building code used nationally used to be about 180 pages long. Nowadays, the building code fills 12 volumes, 300 pages each, and some parts of the code contradict others.  The whole code review process has become really cumbersome.

Dealing with late payments is not much fun either.  They are rare, but they happen occasionally and when they do, the client meetings are usually uncomfortable.  This is stuff they don’t teach you in architecture school.

What advice do you have for students considering an architecture degree?

Work really hard in school – particularly in the area of design –  and get a mentor.  Your mentor will fill in the gaps in your education for you.

Find an architect you admire and ask them to be your mentor.  Trust me, they like mentoring.  I regularly mentor students at Judson University and I love seeing their passion and creativity.  Mentoring gives me great hope for our future!

If you really love architecture – pursue it.  If you don’t have that passion for architecture, the program will weed you out!

If you knew then what you know now . . .

I wouldn’t change anything.

Recognize that you don’t know everything and that you will be learning as you go.  You will make mistakes.

There are times you will be right, but that won’t matter. What matters more is doing the right thing by your clients.

In Illinois, there is lawsuit every two years for every licensed architect.  With myself and two other licensed architects on staff in my firm, I should be facing a lawsuit every year.

I am proud to say that in 26 years – I have never been sued; I’ve never had to set foot in a courtroom!

I recall a meeting with a prospective client who asked “Have you ever had anything go wrong on a project?”  I had to laugh as I suggested an alternative question to her: “How do you handle the inevitable problems that come up during a project?”

Know this – you will encounter problems during your career, everyone does. How you handle the problems (and opportunities) you face will reveal your character and define your career and reputation.

Are Cosmetic Surgery Careers Really A Good Idea?

Cosmetic Surgery

UK-based guest blogger Sam Gatt shares the following advice:

There appears to be a huge influx of talent in the cosmetic surgery industry at the moment, and this is mainly due to the high levels of pay and mostly simply procedures involved. Over the last couple of years, shocking quantities of science and medical graduates have turned to this form of body modification when deciding on the best way to progress their education and career. Still, with so many people getting involved in the industry, could there come a time when it’s impossible to make a good wage from this endeavour?

I mean; the same thing happened with hairdressers a few years ago when colleges around the world started training thousands of students in the role. Unfortunately, this created the situation we face today, where the high streets of our hometowns are filled with hairdressing and beauty businesses unable to make a decent profit because of the sheer amount of competition. Presuming this could happen to body modification specialists, it begs the question; are cosmetic surgery careers really a good idea?

So, over the next few paragraphs, I’ll attempt to reach a conclusion by looking at all the pros and cons of working in this field today.

The Pros Of A Career In Cosmetic Surgery

  • The PayCosmetic surgeons  can earn up to and including half a million each and every year. Although the competition is becoming stiff, this amount looks unlikely to drop to unfeasible levels anytime soon.
  • Job Satisfaction – In instances where you’re performing plastic surgery on someone who’s experienced serious burns or an accident of some kind, you’ll get immense job satisfaction at the end of the day knowing that you are responsible for making that person feel a little more normal.
  • Innovation – Once you’re qualified at a cosmetic surgeon, you’ll be free to create and test your own unique techniques. If you manage to come up with something truly innovative and useful, you could even revolutionise certain parts of the industry.

The Cons Of A Career In Cosmetic Surgery

  • Lengthy Education – Unfortunately, anyone wishing to become a registered cosmetic surgeon will have to undertake a minimum of four to five years training at university, and this can put some people off the idea. However, in a recent survey, only 4% of registered professionals regretted their career choice.
  • Higher Risks – For the obvious reasons, plastic surgeons face an increased risk of malpractice cases, which means you may find yourself defending your techniques in court on more than one occasion. That said; so long as you follow all guidelines, you’ll be covered.

So, you should clearly see that opting for a career in cosmetic surgery is still a very wise move at the current time. This could change in the near future depending on the amount of students enrolling on relevant courses, but anyone considering pursuing this path over the next couple of years shouldn’t experience any major issues. I hope this article will prove useful, and maybe it will have given some of you the inspiration needed to improve your lives.

See you next time!

Sam Gatt
UK-based guest blogger who writes on all thinks business and career-related.